Immigration

GBLS receives grant to provide legal support in defense of immigrants

GBLS is one of 10 organizations selected to receive a grant from the Greater Boston Immigrant Defense Fund. “Immigrants are vital members of our society...this grant will enable GBLS to work with community-based organizations and provide needed legal support,” said GBLS Executive Director Jacquelynne Bowman. Thank you to Boston Mayor Martin Walsh, the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, Massachusetts Law Reform Institute, and the very generous foundations and local partners and donors who made this possible.

With GBLS’ Help, Rwandan Victim of Torture Gains Asylum in the U.S.

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After his search for justice for his father’s murder led to government officials torturing him nearly to death, “Bosco” fled to the U.S. from Rwanda.  He was a child when the genocide in Rwanda broke out in 1994.  Bosco’s Hutu father was brutally murdered when the Rwandan Patriotic Army (RPA) entered Kigali, the capital city, to stop the genocide of the Tutsis, but then aided retaliatory killings of Hutus.

Immigration Impact Advocacy

Immigrant Rights for Children

In Mejia Romero v. Holder the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit vacated a decision of the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) denying asylum to Celvyn Mejilla-Romero, a young man from Honduras who was 13 at the time he applied for asylum. The Court of Appeals sent the case back to the BIA because it had not followed international and national standards regarding children’s asylum cases.

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Immigration
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Providing free noncriminal legal assistance for poor people in Greater Boston

Immigration Unit: Protecting Human Rights

The Immigration Unit provides legal represention and advocates on behalf of low-income immigrants. We prioritize cases of immigrants who are seeking permanent refuge and safe haven, individuals subjected to domestic violence and unaccompanied children. Our goal is to enable our clients to become documented, and ultimately to attain permanent legal status in the United States.

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